PolitiFact: Does Obamacare allow for forced home inspections by government agents?

Last Updated: Tuesday, August 27, 2013, 8:42 AM EDT

Since the 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, many articles have been published on the internet from both supporters and detractors of the legislation. 

A common theme of blogs that do not support the ACA is the potential the act might have on the general public.  Recently, one such blog headline claimed the following:

"SHOCKING: Obamacare Provision Will Allow 'Forced' Home Inspections."

Our partners at PolitiFact took a look at the blog entry and compared it with the legislation as passed. 

Angie Holan
, the Deputy Editor of PolitiFact and the Editor of PolitiFact Florida, reports that the blogger's claim garners a rating of PANTS ON FIRE on the Truth-O-Meter. 

Holan says that the whole concept of "forced home inspections" seems to have originated from a grant program that is funded by the ACA. 

"What it says is that the grant program will be used for 'maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting," Holan said. "The goal of the grant program is to get nurses and social workers in contact with high-risk families, so that these families will have the skills to get their kids ready for school, keep them healthy, and avoid any child-neglect issues."

We asked Holan if that was a fancy way of getting the government into your home to make sure you are complying with Obamacare. 

Holan explains, "The problem with the premise of your question is that you are suggesting that there will be forcible entry.  The law clearly states that 'the participation of each eligible family in the program is voluntary,' and that any state that wishes to participate in this program must include safeguards to make sure that participation remains voluntary."

We posed a follow-up scenario to Holan, and asked what would happen if a family who is participating in this program suddenly decides they don't want a nurse or social worker in their house? 

"We reached out to Samantha Miller, who works in the public affairs office of the Health Resources and Services Administration for U.S. Health & Human Services, and she said families could stop accepting services 'without consequence at any time and for any reason,'" says Holan. 

Holan says that the safeguards built in to the law to prevent intrusions, as well as the original intent of the grant program to provide services to high-risk families, lead to the website claim about "forced home inspections" being rated as PANTS ON FIRE by the Truth-O-Meter.