Black History Month: 'Read-in' celebrates African-American literature

By Brittany Jones, Reporter
Last Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018, 12:04 PM EST

A Flagler County school is celebrating African-American literature this Black History Month to serve as a reminder of the contributions African-Americans made to reading and education.

  • Belle Terre Elementary hosts 'read-in'
  • Goal of read-in was to teach kids African-American history, writing
  • School wants to give African-American books to all students
  • RELATED: Black History Month coverage

The African-American Read-In was the vision for Dr. Terence Culver’s Belle Terre Elementary school.

Now for the second year, he said it’s clear why this is needed every Black History Month.

“It’s about the students and the exposure to reading,” said Dr. Terence culver, principal of Belle Terre Elementary School.

About 100 members from the Flagler, Volusia and Putnam County communities spread out to classrooms to read stories about African-Americans.

The school strategically chose 15 different books like these to emphasize the art and culture of black history.

Culver said the more than 1,500 students in his school aren’t exposed to it enough.

“Probably 90 percent of our books are not written by African Americans,” Culver said.

That is a one-dimensional story he said this event helps change as students from all racial makeups get to hear black authors' books and learn about the history.

“I want them to see a future for themselves. I want them to be inspired by the people that came here to see that all the different people in the community. black and white. that have come out for them,” said author Barbara Solomon.

Fourth-grader Paityn Lawrence told Spectrum News 13 she loved the stories and is grateful the volunteers care about her learning about her culture.

“That was very nice of them. I think it was very nice, because they’re reading to all these people, teaching them and reading books to them,” Lawrence said.

The read-in gave the students lasting exposure.

“We’re going to do everything in our power to make sure students are exposed to all types of literature,” Culver said.

The school has set a goal to provide African-American literature books to all students. People from the community are making donations to help.