Man charged in deadly Daytona Beach hit-and-run faces judge

By Anthony Leone and Brittany Jones, Team Coverage
Last Updated: Thursday, February 08, 2018, 10:16 PM EST

The man arrested in a hit-and-run in Daytona Beach appeared before a Volusia County Judge Thursday after police accused him of hitting and leaving a woman dead on the side of the road.

Juan Alberto Correa has been charged with causing a crash involving death, according to an affidavit. The judge increased Correa’s bond to $25,000 Thursday when Correra made his first appearance.  

Rusty Bovee was found on the side of a street near South Nova Road and Forest Glen Boulevard early Wednesday morning. The Daytona Beach Police Department has been investigating the 35-year-old woman's death and was looking for an older Mitsubishi Raider.

During the investigation, an officer found a headlight assembly and three Walmart plastic bags, with laundry soap being among the items, near Bovee's body, revealed the affidavit.

The officer learned that the headlight assembly matched a Raider.

As officers were canvassing the area, they found a pickup truck at a home on Marion Street that matched the make and model that the headlight assembly belonged to and the vehicle had "front end damage" that "was consistent with hitting a pedestrian," according to the affidavit.

The home belonged to Correa, a Daytona Beach resident.

The 63-year-old Correa and two other people were in the yard and agreed to go with law enforcement to talk about the case.

While parts of the affidavit have been redacted, it did reveal that laundry soap was found on the pickup, along with a piece of hair discovered on the front hood of the vehicle. The affidavit did not state if the laundry soap or hair was tested to see if they matched the laundry soap found near the accident or Bovee, respectively.

Due to the redacted parts of the affidavit, it is unclear if Correa ever admitted to hitting Bovee or not, but it does state that he did call Geico Insurance, he told the two people mentioned previously, labeled as "witnesses", that he was involved in a crash and that he never called the police about an accident.

However, the affidavit did mention that Correa admitted to drinking alcohol before the accident.

"It should be noted that during the interview the Def. (Correa) advised that he had been drinking beer, and consumed approximately 6 to 7 beers prior to the crash," according to the affidavit.

"We request the court consider that he has no felony convictions, misdemeanors convictions, no failures to appear in court," said the public defender.

The public defender asked for leniency, but the judge denied his motion for a supervised release.

A close friend of the victim said she was hilarious, outgoing and a beautiful person.

Correa is facing a felony for leaving the scene of a crash that caused a death.