Florida Amendments Voting Guide

When Florida voters go to the polls for the general election, they'll be asked to decide on Six amendments to the Florida Constitution.

The amendment issues vary widely -- and in some cases you have multiple issues in the same amendment.

Remember, all amendments must be approved by 60 percent of Florida voters to be added to the constitution.

Use this guide to help you better understand all the amendments before you turn in your ballot.

Amendment 1

This amendment provides that only United States Citizens who are at least eighteen years of age, a permanent resident of Florida, and registered to vote, as provided by law, shall be qualified to vote in a Florida election.

  • YES VOTE — Changed Florida Constitution to say that ONLY citizens who are 18, permanent Florida residents and registered to vote may vote in Florida elections.
  • NO VOTE -- Keeps the current Florida Constitution language, which says that EVERY citizen who is 18, a permanent Florida resident and registered to vote may vote in Florida elections.

Amendment 1 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 1

amendment 2

Raises minimum wage to $10.00 per hour effective September 30th, 2021. Each September 30th thereafter, minimum wage shall increase by $1.00 per hour until the minimum wage reaches $15.00 per hour on September 30th, 2026. From that point forward, future minimum wage increases shall revert to being adjusted annually for inflation starting September 30th, 2027.

  • YES VOTE — Approves the increase in minimum wage based on the plan above
  • NO VOTE — Rejects the amendment

Amendment 2 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 2

amendment 3

Allows all registered voters to vote in primaries for state legislature, governor, and cabinet regardless of political party affiliation. All candidates for an office, including party nominated candidates, appear on the same primary ballot. Two highest vote getters advance to general election. If only two candidates qualify, no primary is held and winner is determined in general election. Candidate’s party affiliation may appear on ballot as provided by law. Effective January 1, 2024.

  • YES VOTE — You support a primary where all candidates for a state office appear on a ballot, regardless of party affiliation, and the top two vote getters advance to the November election.
  • NO VOTE — Rejects the amendment

Amendment 3 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 3

amendment 4

Requires all proposed amendments or revisions to the state constitution to be approved by the voters in two elections, instead of one, in order to take effect. The proposal applies the current thresholds for passage to each of the two elections.

  • YES VOTE — You support requiring voters to vote on the same amendment twice, in two general elections (example: 2020 and 2022) before it can become effective
  • NO VOTE — Rejects the amendment

Amendment 4 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 4

amendment 5

Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution, effective date January 1, 2021, to increase, from 2 years to 3 years, the period of time during which accrued Save-Our-Homes benefits may be transferred from a prior homestead to a new homestead.

  • YES VOTE — You support extending the period that a person can transfer their Save-Our-Homes benefits to a new Homestead property from two years to three years.
  • NO VOTE — Rejects the amendment

Amendment 5 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 5

amendment 6

Provides that the homestead property tax discount for certain veterans with permanent combat-related disabilities carries over to such veteran's surviving spouse who holds legal or beneficial title to, and who permanently resides on, the homestead property, until he or she remarries or sells or otherwise disposes of the property. The discount may be transferred to a new homestead property of the surviving spouse under certain conditions. The amendment takes effect January 1, 2021.

  • YES VOTE — You support allowing the homestead discount on a property to be transferred to the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran.
  • NO VOTE — Rejects the amendment

Amendment 6 Details | Making Sense of Amendment 6

WHAT'S ON YOUR BALLOT?

Candidates and Campaigns | Making Sense of the Amendments

ELECTION CALENDAR:

  • October 5, 2020
    • Voter Registration Deadline (general election)
  • October 24, 2020
    • Deadline to request a vote-by-mail ballot
  • November 3, 2020
    • General Election
    • Vote-by-mail ballots due by 7 p.m. on this day

EARLY VOTING:

The Early Voting period must last at least 8 days before each election, with the counties able to add more days as they need. Check with your county for the Early Voting period. Many counties in Florida are starting as early as October 19. Frequently Asked Questions

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